Alphabet Letters

 

· Students put the alphabet together as illustrated.

 

· Time student the first time and then periodically.

 

· Some students like to set the timer by themselves.  Others are apprehensive and do not like to be timed at first.

 

· Record the student’s time as you see improvement.

 

· When putting the letters away in the box ask student to give the sound of the letter and the key word from KEY SOUNDS

 

· Letters may be used to work on spelling words that need reinforcement, making rhyming words from WORD   FAMILIES, and letter order for dictionary skills,.               e.g. What comes after “c”?                                                     What letter comes before “g”?                                                 I will say a letter.  You give me my letter and the next two.  e.g. “a” -a,b,c; “f” -f,g,h; “w” -w,x,y

Description of MEB/PACT Materials   -Page Four

Text Box: Traceable Alphabet

Traceable Alphabet:  Once a student is comfortable doing the primary motifs in the Motif Writing book he will begin to master the strokes needed to print the alphabet letters. Students enjoy tracing models. This is a good step in the sequence of teaching the brain to make the various strokes which are needed to master printing the alphabet letters.

       Handwriting is a complex visual symbol system. It is

important for children to learn to make the strokes in the correct direction. Directionality awareness is needed to make the pencil motions quickly and neatly. Visual-motor perception is required to discriminate and to produce differences in the sizes and shapes of each letter. The motifs in the PACT  Motif  Writing book help

students learn to make the various shapes and sizes of each

alphabet letter. Fine motor co-ordination is needed to hold a pencil or pen properly. Memory is needed to remember how each letter is made and the order of the letters to spell words. For students to be able to express their ideas the mechanics of manuscript and cursive writing need to be automatic. A student who needs to

concentrate too hard to make neat and legible letters will often be the student who does not complete writing and essay projects.  Students have mastered the written alphabet when they can write it neatly in two minutes or less.